Environmental Technology, News

A voyage to the world’s coldest seas to learn more about climate change

When Svein Østerhus celebrates Christmas in Antarctica, he’ll be continuing climate research that began back in 1928.

On 19 December, researcher Svein Østerhus of Uni Research will leave on his tenth expedition to Antarctica. He won’t be back home in Norway until March. .

“I’ll be spending Christmas Eve on the Norwegian territory Bouvet Island, the world’s most remote uninhabitable island,” said Østerhus.

But of course it’s not Christmas that makes Østerhus spend the winter as far south as you can get. The goal of the expedition is to find out even more about what climate change will mean for the Antarctic ice and as a result how much sea levels could rise.

Measuring instruments

“This is a continuation of research started back in 1928. That’s when Håkon Mosby from the Geophysical Institute took part in the Norvegia expedition. Based on the discoveries he made, he developed theories that the ice shelves played an important part in creating the coldest and heaviest water in the world’s oceans. These theories have provided guidelines for our Antarctic research and led to numerous expeditions to perform measurements in the Weddell Sea,” explained Østerhus.

 

To read more, please visit the Uni Research website here.