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Viking Shiptech Introduces 80 Knot Ships

Viking Shiptech

Norwegian company Viking Shiptech has developed a new patent pending shipping technology, which is expected to bring in considerable environmental benefits.

The concept combines the delivery time speed of air transport and price range applicable for shipping.

“The air transport has an 80 times higher CO2-emission than shipping, and is also 80 times more expensive. If we can move cargo from airplanes to ships, the eco winnings would be bigger than those introduced by any other measures,” the company explains.

By moving only 3% of the cargo from airplanes, the reduction in CO2-emission is estimated to more than 80% with current fuel.

Viking Shiptech 1

The new technological solution being introduced by Viking Shiptech are ships that can reach up to 80 knots of speed. Under the concept, a ship is powered by turbines that make a hundred times gyro stabilization, and then, the ship, gaining on the torque force, is being propelled forward “as cast in the sea”.

Combined with a submersible Swath solution, it provides a 100 % stability in all speeds and up 10 meters high waves, the designer claims. On the other hand, an increased platform width is aimed at preventing the inclining of the vessel, distributing the cargo to lowered stacks and gravity.

“Two jet engines in front of the platform reduce the air resistance, and then supply the subsea surface with an air layer that destroys the shear forces. High speed combined with a torque controlled pressure distribution make a permanent efficiency of air lubrication in all seas and weathers,” the company adds.

In terms of design capacity, the ships in question would feature up to 16,500 in TEU, 17 meters in maximum depth and up to 300 meters in length overall.

The design is said to be able to provide up to 37% in fuel savings when compared to slow moving ships, based on results of CFD-analysis.

According to Viking Shiptech, the 80 knots ship requires lower crewing requirement (-72%) when compared to what is currently required on regular ships.

“By compensating the building prices of four 16 knots ships with one 80 knots ship, the money from the residual three can be invested in technology instead of several ships,” the company added.

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