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Promoting cold climate technology amongst global warming.

Norwegian project ColdTech is looking into ways to promote and develop cold climate technology amongst global warming.

Facts

  • ColdTech is one of five projects funded by NORDSATSING (‘North Initiative’), the governmental panoply for competency development in northern Norway. One spinoff of that aim is that ColdTech has rapidly acquired an international character.
  • Its academic partners include the National Research Council Canada, the Archangel State Technical University (ASTU), and VNIIG, a major research centre in Russia.
  • The doctoral candidate students on the project include ones enrolled at Luleå Technical University in Sweden and the University of Hertfordshire in the UK.
  • Project manager Christian Petrich is a German-born physicist educated in Germany, the US, and New Zealand now living in northern Norway.

“The relatively thick, usually deformed sea ice that floats in oceans may be a hazard to vessel traffic or other installations in the far north. So engineers should be prepared for ice conditions in design, and operators should be aware of them thereafter,” says project manager Christian Petrich.

 

“That’s why we’re trying to make sure we know what’s out there. It’s a challenge, as not much has been reported in the Western Barents Sea (between Norway and Svalbard),” he adds.

 

The ColdTech’s project is a research initiative dedicated to promoting and developing sustainable cold climate technology. The project is a collaboration between research institutions led by Norut, the Northern Research Institute facility at Narvik. Political and economic forces are following the development of the project closely. Commercial shipping passages across the top of the globe are being tested by major powers as global warming opens Arctic seas.

Former research projects have been able to prove how the sea ice behave, but there is still a long way to go in understanding why it behaves it way it does. ColdTech seeks, amongst other things, to understand the pressure ridges that arise between broken ice sheets.

 

If you would like more information about the project, please read the full article here.

 

Image in header: Denise Sudom, National Research Council Canada/ColdTech

Image on front page: Christian Petrich/Norut Narvik

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