Looking for a specific product?

Make a search for products & suppliers, articles & news.

More marine research cooperation with Japan

salmon Japan is a major market for Norwegian salmon Up to now, cooperation between Japan and Norway on marine research has primarily revolved around safe seafood. The seminar made it clear that researchers in the two countries share a broader range of scientific interests and are looking to expand cooperation significantly. Relevant areas of focus include marine resource management, aquaculture and renewable marine energy.

As the world seeks ways to satisfy its growing demand for food as well as energy, the sustainable use of marine resources grows increasingly important. The objective of the seminar was to address challenges related to the sustainable replenishment of fisheries and the rebuilding of coastal communities following the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011.

Two leading marine nations

At the opening of the seminar, Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry Trond Giske and State Secretary Kristine Gramstad of the Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs stressed the need for increased Norwegian-Japanese cooperation on research and technology development. Bringing together research communities and industrial and political communities will help to promote new ties between the two countries.

“As two of the world’s leading nations in marine research, we face many of the same challenges. Norway and Japan are natural partners in research and technology development,” stated Ms Gramstad.

Suisan Keizai Shimbun Sha “Norway has an international reputation as a leading seafood producer,” said Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry Trond Giske at the seminar. (Photo: Suisan Keizai Shimbun Sha) “Norway has an international reputation as a leading seafood producer,” said Minister Giske, “and we seek to take a leading role in developing renewable energy and other alternative uses of marine resources. Cooperation between coastal nations such as Japan and Norway is essential for solving the challenges facing our nations and the global community at large. I hope this seminar represents the beginning of new joint projects.”

Sustainable aquaculture

Also addressing the seminar was Kjell Emil Naas, programme coordinator for the Research Council’s HAVBRUK programme, who pointed out some of the key contributions that research has made to the phenomenal growth of salmon production since the 1970s.

“If such growth is to continue, however, we must master the problems we do not yet have control over – meaning sea lice and production fish escapes,” says Mr Naas. The HAVBRUK programme devotes a great deal of resources to developing knowledge that can help to solve these problems.

Reducing the discharge of inorganic nutrients, sustainable production of feed, and disease prevention are other key research topics for securing a sustainable future for Norwegian aquaculture.

Important export market for Norway

Japan is a major market for Norwegian mackerel, salmon trout, capelin, and particularly salmon. Every day, two million meals that include Norwegian seafood are consumed in Japan.

Næss If the phenomenal growth of salmon production is to continue, we must master problems like sea lice and production fish escapes, says Kjell Emil Naas, programme coordinator for the Research Council’s HAVBRUK programme. But the potential for cooperation between Japan and Norway encompasses much more than salmon exports.

“We see there is an excellent foundation for cooperation because many Japanese are turning to Norway for answers on how to rebuild their marine activities. Furthermore, Norway has seafood, technology and expertise that Japan needs,” states Svein Grandum, Counsellor for Science and Technology at Innovation Norway in Tokyo.

The seminar, held 10 May, was organised in cooperation with the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Innovation Norway, Seafood Norway, the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Tokyo, and the Japan Fisheries Association.
 

 

Related news

Latest news

Biggest feed barge delivery ever

At the shipyard in Gdynia Poland, 7 feed barges were recently loaded onboard the vessel Jumbo Vision. The barges are destined for Canada and will be operational this summer. 

Max Planck and CMR cooperation

Scientists at Christian Michelsen Research are currently developing, together with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Iron Research (Germany), the Field Kelvin Probe (FKP). This FKP will enable contactless detect...

Consilium equips 48 buildings in Galway, Ireland, with lifesaving panels

Consilium Building Safety has received a strategical order from our Irish distributor...

CADCAM options for the open-minded

“Naval architects log into the Vestdavit digital library and can download exactly what they need within a couple of minutes,

DNV GL COMPIT Award 2017 for smart underwater robotics

Marco Bibuli was announced as the winner of the DNV GL COMPIT Award 2017, which took place in Cardiff this year. The Italian maritime robotics expert, working at the Italian research centre CNR-ISSIA in Genova, was honoure...

Record Number Applications for the Innovation Award!

A total of 28 applications for the Nor-Fishing Foundation Innovation Award, – which includes a check for NOK 100 000 – has been received by the deadline the 1st of May. This represents a 36% increase from record year ...

Midt-Norsk Havbruk and Plastsveis enter into agreement to build smolt facility

“We have followed the development of technology for smolt production carefully for several years,

DNV GL launches on-demand, web-based forecasting at WindPower 2017

Energy traders and plant operators gain online access to hourly forecast data at plant and regional level...

International Quality Awards announced

The Chartered Quality Institute (CQI) launches a series of quality awards designed to recognize the contribution of quality professionals across the globe.