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More funds for mobile researchers

The Research Council has decided to expand the top-up financing scheme for doctoral/post-doctoral students and researchers receiving EU support through Marie Curie Actions to include those traveling from Norway to undertake research stays at research institutions abroad.

Curie

For experienced researchers

The supplementary funding is only available to Norwegian researchers taking part in one of these two Marie Curie research fellowship programmes: Intra-European Fellowships for career development (IEF) and International Outgoing Fellowships for career development (IOF). Both types of fellowship are primarily directed towards what the EU defines as experienced researchers.

The scheme ensures that these Marie Curie research fellows receive the same compensation for stays abroad as doctoral/post-doctoral students and researchers whose funding comes through programmes financed directly by the Research Council.

Encouraging more researchers to go abroad

Several evaluations of Norwegian research conclude that Norwegian researchers would benefit from increasing the time spent at research institutions abroad. At present, the number of applicants and approved projects from Norway funded under Marie Curie Actions is lower than for countries Norway normally uses for comparison.

One important factor behind this low level of interest has been that the fellowship amounts and the salaries for Marie Curie fellows have been lower than for doctoral/post-doctoral students in projects funded by the Research Council.

“This new top-up financing scheme is one of several measures being taken by the Research Council to encourage more researchers to apply for Marie Curie Actions fellowships to carry out research abroad,” explains Anders Hanneborg, Executive Director of the Division for Science at the Research Council.

“Research stays abroad and international collaboration are vital to producing high-quality research, and the Research Council gives high priority to incentives aimed at strengthening researcher mobility.”

hanneborg

This new top-up financing scheme is one of several measures being taken by the Research Council to encourage more researchers to apply for Marie Curie Actions fellowships, explains Anders Hanneborg, Executive Director of the Division for Science at the Research Council.

Corresponding scheme for researchers coming to Norway

A funding scheme providing researchers to Norway from abroad with the same salaries as their Norwegian colleagues has been in place since 2008. The Research Council covers the difference between standard salaries in Norway and the EU.

At the time it was not possible to implement a parallel scheme for researchers travelling from Norway on EU funding, as it was in conflict with EU regulations. These regulations have since been revised.

First application deadline August 2013

Researchers awarded funding under one of the fellowship programmes covered by the scheme may apply for a personal overseas research grant in the same way as for ongoing projects under the Research Council’s funding scheme for independent basic research projects (FRIPRO).

The regular personal overseas research grant is intended to cover additional expenses incurred in connection with research stays abroad and employs fixed rates. At present, the sum is NOK 162 000 for researchers travelling alone and NOK 324 000 for those travelling with family. For Marie Curie Action fellows, the Research Council will cover the difference between the respective amount above and the amount of the fellowship provided by the EU. The funding pledge will be applicable for a period of maximum two years.

The next call for proposals for IEF and IOF fellowships under the Marie Curie Actions is 14 August 2013. It will be possible to apply for top-up financing from the Research Council at the same time.

 

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