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Arctic ship "Maud" travels back to Norway

The process has started to rise the arctic ship Maud out from the water and get her safely transported back to Norway from Canada.

Explorer Roald Amundsen's polar ship Maud has been at the bottom of Cambridge Bay in Canada since 1930. Now the work has begun to get her out of the water, and on her way back to Norway.

The ship might arrive back home next summer, informs Jan Wangaard, who is the project leader for the ship's transfer.

A film crew has accompanied Wangaard on his trip to Canada. They plan to take pictures and make a movie based on the process of bringing the ship safely back to Asker outside of Oslo, where the boat will be preserved and placed in a museum.

Wangaard says that he feels confident that the ship can handle the transfer from Canada to Norway. The low temperature in the water may have actually helped preserve the ship, he explains.

Amundsen originally had the ship built in 1917, but in 1925 it was sold to the Hudson's Bay company when Amundsen declared bankruptcy. Five years later it sank, and has been lying at the bottom of Cambridge Bay for more than 80 years.

Asker municipality bought the ship in 1990, but never started the process of moving the ship back to Asker. Real estate company Tandberg Eindom took over the ship in 2011, but was met with some resistance from the local population in Canada, who wanted the ship to stay in Cambridge Bay. Finally, in March, a Canadian appeals committee decided that the ship can be transferred out of the country.

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