Looking for a specific product?

Make a search for products & suppliers, articles & news.

Ambitious wind farm plan for Russia

A scheme to build massive wind farms in Russia's Arctic northwest and sell the resulting electricity to Europe could kick-start the country's renewable energy industry.

The plan, dubbed RUSTEC, would see dozens of onshore wind farms built across the Murmansk region and plugged into a "power bridge" carrying the energy into the European grid via Norway or Finland.

It is the brainchild of the International Finance Corporation (IFO), the branch of the World Bank Group that provides private sector financing for global development.

RUSTEC proposes to bring Russian Wind to the European continent over existing and new inter connections. It will help some EU countries to reach their 2020 renewable energy targets at more economical cost, engender a kick off start for renewables in Russia and open a new, potentially large export market for European know how and technology, IFO’s web site reads.

Supporters of the plan argue that low production costs and unusually high winds in the Russian Far North will produce efficiencies that actually make electricity generated there cheaper than renewable energy produced in Europe.

"I was inspired by DESERTEC — the plan to build solar stations in the Sahara desert in northwest Africa and transmit electricity to Southern Europe. I thought, why solar power from Africa, why not wind power in Russia?" said Patrick Willems, the project manager of the IFC's program to develop renewable energy in Russia, The Moscow Times reports. 

Willems argued that onshore wind farms in places like the Murmansk region can generate more energy than expensive offshore plants in Europe. He added that, as Europe looks to meet its ambitious energy targets, it will pay handsomely for Russian wind power.

The EU is meant to reduce its greenhouse gases by 20 percent and bring renewable sources to 20 percent of its energy generation by 2020, while Germany has a target of going 80 percent renewable by 2050.

The Murmansk region, meant to be the epicenter of project, is currently devoid of wind energy — although Dutch firm Windlife is currently metering the wind at potential sites there.

Related news

Latest news

The Foundation Det Norske Veritas assumes full ownership of DNV GL and remains committed to Maritime headquarters in Hamburg

The merger between DNV and GL has created significant value,

Servogear has achieved the ISO 14001: 2015 environmental certificate

The certificate provides a framework that an organization can follow,

TechnipFMC opens 18,000m² facility to support Middle East market

The opening of the 18,000 m2 facility,

INDUSTRY 4.0 WILL CHANGE ISS

The 2017 Beerenberg seminar held earlier this year addressed the fourth industrial revolution.

The upside down advocate

The hulls of the robust Polarcirkel boats consists of resistant PE plastic,

DNV GL presents GTT and TECHNOLOG with GASA statement for exoskeleton LNG tanks

The solution has been developed for VLCVs with a capacity of 14,000 to 18,000 

DNV GL: Mix of flexibility solutions needed to stabilize power grids and avoid outages

In its recently published Energy Transition Outlook report (ETO),

Marintec China: DNV GL awards DSIC a pair of AiP certificates

Lu Xiao Hui, Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of DSIC,

DNV GL partners with SP Energy Networks to develop local flexibility market and reduce carbon emissions by over 3 megatonnes

The flexibility market will be based on the Universal Smart Energy Framework (USEF),