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Lunch with representatives from the energy sector in Indonesia

The Minister based his address on some of these points: 

 

  • Energy issues important for foreign policy relations. Energy is key political priority for both Indonesia and Norway – and so is climate change – and the two closely linked. Energy at the core of Norway’s efforts to address climate change. 

  • Joint Declaration on Energy and Climate cooperation from 2007 between President Yudhoyono and Prime Minister Stoltenberg. Bilateral Energy Dialog dating back from MoU in 1995, revitalized under Stoltenberg’s visit to Jakarta in 2007.

     
  • Energy Change mentioned as key sectors in the “Joint declaration between Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia and Norway”. Signed this morning with Minister Marty Natalagawa. 

  • Impressive prospects for continued economic growth in Indonesia. Norway ready to engage more in business cooperation, trade and within the energy sector. The cooperation between Norway and Indonesia in the petroleum sector is strong. The presence of Statoil and their cooperation with Pertamina.

     
  • Norway is the second largest supplier of gas to the European market. As in Europe, gas will have a prominent place in Indonesia’s energy mix for decades to come. Natural gas has a key role to play in reducing CO2 emissions – and as a bridge to a low carbon energy future.

      
  • Renewable energy sources are vital for a sustainable future, but up scaling takes time. Indonesia aims to 25 % renewable energy of total energy consumption in 2025. Norway is the world’s 6th largest producer of hydropower and can offer knowledge and experience in hydropower development. Now, there is established contact between Indonesian and Norwegian partners. Jointly, the Government of Norway and Indonesia are supporting Baron Techno Park: a renewable energy center close to Yogyakarta.

     
  • President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has pledged Indonesia to be the world’s largest geothermal energy producer. Cooperation between Indonesian and Norwegian partners under establishment.

     
  • Reducing fossil fuel emissions: To move forward in the field of CCS, CCS technologies on a large scale have to start implementing. Extensive technology transfer and international cooperation is a prerequisite for global deployment of CSS. The IEA sees CCS as a key, even the key emission reduction technology towards 2050, complementing energy efficiency and renewable energy efforts. CCS represents an option for using fossil fuel both during and after the transition to a low-emission economy.

 

 

 

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