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Full-scale carbon capture and storage at Mongstad

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a central part of the Norwegian policy on energy and climate change. 

Read the press release: Change in direction of commitment to Carbon Capture and Storage

The governments work on carbon capture and storage on Mongstad

In October 2006, the Norwegian government granted Statoil permission for the building of a combined heat and power plant (CHP) at Mongstad. At the same time, the Norwegian State and Statoil agreed on developing CCS technology at Mongstad in two stages: First, a CO2 Capture Technology Centre (TCM), followed by the construction of a large scale plant at a later stage. The large scale CCS project at Mongstad included CO2 capture, transport and storage from the CHP plant at Mongstad. Captured CO2 would be transported by pipeline for storage under the seabed in the North Sea.

The construction of the Technology Centre progressed according to plan and was opened in may 2011. TCM is the largest center of its kind, with an annual capacity for handling up to 100,000 tons of CO2. The Centre will test CO2 capture on two types of flue gases using two capture technologies, hence; the testing is also relevant to CCS on coal-fired power plants.

Since 2006, the Government and Statoil have worked together with the aim of establishing a large scale capture plant at Mongstad. The source of CO2 for the planned capture plant is the exhaust gas from the CHP plant. At full capacity, the CO2 emissions from the CHP plant may be up to 1.3 million tons of CO2 annually. CO2 was to be captured from a plant already in operation; hence only post-combustion capture was considered relevant for the CHP plant. CO2 capture from power generation has not been accomplished at this scale previously. The capture plant at Mongstad was to be established at a complex industrial area containing several sub-plants, all of which would be in normal operation during construction and operation of the capture plant. An important premise in the work was therefore to be attentive to the challenges such a project is facing. The project planning must carefully balance project progress, risk management, costs and technology development.

The inclusion of alternative capture technologies in the technology qualification process implied that qualification of capture technologies would be carried out prior to the engineering phase of the full scale project. Statoil, which was responsible for carrying out the project, estimates that the technology qualification would be in progress up to 3 years. The following engineering phase will last approximately two years, leading up to a basis for an investment decision presented for the Parliament no later than 2016. If qualification of at least one capture technology was completed before the three year period, the issue of technology selection would be addressed immediately.

 

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